Vengeance Can Be Deadly

In book five of the Warren Steelgrave series, Warren has settled into a comfortable life in a small village in Northern Italy. Suddenly all that changes. Having just left a dear friend, she is murdered, and he has become the prime suspect.

Warren Steelgrave cared deeply for her and swears to avenge her death and clear his name. Warren untangles a web of deceit, at first benign, then grown malignant by greed and evil. Professional criminals have become involved with international spies and mafia accomplices. Steelgrave’s sworn vengeance and “willingness” to find justice has put him and his loved ones in grave danger.

Travel down the dark alleyways of intrigue through Italy and the United States. Warren is warned: vengeance can be deadly. Will, there be justice and light at the end of this literary journey, or will the last chapter be Warren’s obituary?

Ken Meirovitz

Reviews

"In Vengeance Can Be Deadly (Warren Steelgrave series) by Gary E Smith, when writer Warren Steelgrave left Marie Sategna's Florence apartment one morning, little did he know that she would be murdered in cold blood shortly afterward. Since Warren was the last person to see her alive, he soon becomes suspect number one by the local police. Warren must find her killer to clear his name. He calls on his old friend Jim Dempsey from the FBI to help with his investigations and find the person responsible for Marie's assassination. As more murders occur, Warren uncovers a deadly espionage ring involving organized crime that is slowly eliminating every witness. With his life at stake, time is quickly running out for Warren to find those responsible before he becomes the next victim. As more information is revealed, Warren doesn't know who is a friend and who is involved in the murders. Warren decides to take drastic action and do something he never thought he was capable of.

I have read previous novels in Gary E Smith's Warren Steelgrave series and Vengeance Can Be Deadly did not disappoint at all. The action started immediately with an incredibly explosive scene. I loved how the plot took many twists and turns; you truly did not know which character was working against Warren. I thought each character was so realistic, even the minor personalities in the novel were memorable, especially the villains - they were the true essence of evil. Warren is a superb hero because he makes no apologies for his flaws but at the same time, he is kind, intelligent, and fiercely protective of those close to him. There is so much thrilling tension throughout especially as Warren takes some pretty dangerous decisions to outwit the criminals. I enjoyed how the plot was layered and the revelations were slowly revealed, especially around who was involved in the murders and who was innocent. There is also a powerful message within the story about how a man's desire for wealth can lead them to commit the most heinous of crimes. Another incredible story and although you could read this book on its own, I really recommend you read the others in the series to get a real taste of the brilliant characters and their relationships with each other."
- Lesley Jones, Writers Favorite

My Life My Choice

In My Life My Choice by Gary Smith, a computer expert and nephew of a Mafia boss developed an advanced protocol to hack any computer system before he disappeared.

The Moretti crime family believes the FBI knows his whereabouts and summon old adversary and novelist Warren Steelgrave to a meeting. Warren finds himself entangled in the mystery to discover the whereabouts of Mauro Moretti and find the missing protocol believed to put the national security of the country at risk.

Also hunting for the protocol is a group of sadistic terrorists, called Allah's Army, who hired Mauro. Warren becomes a mere pawn in a dangerous game between the Mafia, FBI and Allah's Army. As Warren discovers the terrorist plan will end the lives of many, including his former love, he is willing to sacrifice everything to prevent them from carrying out their mission.

Reviews

"My Life My Choice by Gary Smith is an exceptionally well-written novel filled with excellent twists and turns throughout the plot. As well as the main plot of Warren and his involvement with the Mafia and FBI, there are also many sub-plots that are equally as gripping. The pace of the story is just right and the areas of conflict are perfectly placed. Each character is created with a detailed, unique personality. I loved the main character Warren, his flaws made him so much more relatable. I also thought Jim Dempsey of the FBI was a memorable character; very cool, calm and collected. The way the plot unfolded and uncovered another layer to the story was the most impressive part of this novel. There was suspense, intrigue, and even a love triangle. I really could not put it down. I am hoping there will be a sequel to this book as the ending left it open to learn more about Warren and the other characters." - Lesley Jones, Writers Favorite

Undomesticated: She Had No Remorse

A small Nebraska town is terrorized by a serial killer who targets young “good” girls. The prime suspect disappears and may have himself become someone else’s victim.

The local Nebraska town newspaper hires Warren Steelgrave a best-selling novelist as an investigative reporter because of his unique insights and his uncanny instinct for finding the truth. More papers will be sold, and more eyes will be focused on the town’s plight.

In this third novel in the Steelgrave series, author and photographer Gary Smith takes us along another thought-provoking journey with surprising twists and suspense filled alleyways. Warren Steelgrave explores the psyche of an “undomesticated” killer. Unlike other serial who acts without remorse, an undomesticated killer believes killing is a natural state of being to nurture the soul; The same way as killing plants and animals’ nurtures and sustains life.  Warren soon realizes that he shares many traits with the killer. It is a fine line that makes his own “willingness” to do what is necessary be socially acceptable.

Warren’s romantic kindred spirit, Cindy O’Brien, has been living her life separate; writing songs and performing them across the country. She suddenly joins Warren in Nebraska to escape a deadly stalker. The readers of Smith’s first two books know that Warren will never leave that “stone unturned”.

The varied character plots intertwine as the story unfolds. The reader is challenged to confront their own human nature and how they might react given a challenge outside their moral comfort zone. This latest adventure has an ending that won’t be decided by a jury.

- Ken Meirovitz

Listen to a sample from the Audio version below.

Reviews

"If you’re looking for a quick read over the weekend or on vacation, and like to get straight into the action without getting bogged down in detailed descriptions and back stories on the characters, pick up Undomesticated by Gary Smith. While Warren Steelgrave, author and temporary reporter/sleuth is the male protagonist in this fast-paced novel, the female detective, Kimberly Johnston, with whom the novel opens, grabs the reader from the word go. You realize immediately there is something very different about this respected policewoman and find yourself eagerly turning pages to find out who she really is. What you discover is compelling and more than a little disturbing.

 

Like the reader, for some uncanny reason, perhaps their very similarity, Steelgrave also finds Kimberly captivating and mentally challenging. Together, yet separately, they search for the identity of a serial killer whose victims are young adult blonde females. Which one of them will identify that killer first? That is for you, dear reader, to find out. While the interesting plot and realistic characters of Undomesticated keep this mystery murder novel moving, what is even more memorable is the discussion between Steelgrave and Kimberly about what it means to be an “undomesticated” human being. It’s a concept I haven’t come across in any other crime-based fiction that I’ve read. Perhaps it’ll be new to you too. That said, don’t be surprised if you come away wondering if you, too, are undomesticated. I did. Enjoy reading and reflecting on this fascinating concept." - Viga Boland 

A Life Separate: Together

Gary Smith, Photographer, and author of The Willing, uses his unique perspective and well-honed instincts to take us on a journey replete with vivid descriptions of the beauty and culture of Northern Italy.

“Real life” fictional character Warren Steelgrave has settled into his author’s persona amongst new-found relatives and friends in a small village in Northern Italy. After three years, his possible soulmate and object of romantic memories, Cindy O’Brian comes back into his life. New adventures unfold involving the son of an old friend and the intrigue of the FBI, a crime family, and a long-lost secret for Nicola Tesla’s “death ray”

Warren is again “willing” to put his life on the line, but can Cindy accept the realization that the man she loves will always “live a life separate” even if they are together? While they are back in the United States, with trouble in tow, his eldest daughter adds insight when she tells Cindy “welcome to Warren’s world.”

Perhaps the safest place to enjoy the unfolding of events is from a safe distance as the reader of Mr. Smith’s newest novel.

- Ken Meirovitz

Reviews

"A Life Separate: Together is a novel of intrigue written by Gary Smith. Although this book is written as a sequel/companion piece to his earlier novel, The Willing, Smith provides enough background information for this book to be enjoyed as a standalone novel. Warren Steelgrave was thrilled to be back with Cindy again after their three years apart. He had settled in the small Italian village of Varni, which had been the home of his great-grandfather, and lived there for six months each year. While sitting at the Bar Pasticceria Cabosse the morning before, he looked up and saw her standing there. She was now divorced and had come to Italy to find him. They spent the day exploring the area and dining, and then the night in each other’s arms. Could this possibly work, he wondered. Their first adventure was to the Gran San Bernardo Pass, and they toured the monastery where the famous dogs are still raised and trained, but Warren began to notice that they were being tailed.

Gary Smith’s novel of intrigue, A Life Separate: Together, immediately grabbed my attention with the incredible photographs of Varni, Gran San Bernardo and the other sights Warren and Cindy explored. I love travel fiction and found plenty in both the writing and those photographs to keep me happily engaged. There’s also a cracking good plot surrounding the famous lost papers of Nikola Tesla and Warren’s friend’s son, who had finally found them and had been kidnapped. Watching as Warren and Cindy interact as a team, even after their three years apart, was a joy, and made me wonder if Smith has future adventures for the two of them in mind. A Life Separate: Together is action-packed, suspenseful and fun, and it’s most highly recommended." - Jack Magnus

THE WILLING

Reviews

"The characters are realistic. The plot is well thought out and executed. There are surprises and twists that make the reader want to keep reading. The book is short enough to be read at one sitting and then make you want more. I do hope Gary Smith will write a sequel to this book. It is a very enjoyable book." - P. Blevins

"This book is for both men and women with a content that feeds the hunger of action and emotion. I enjoyed the personal reflection of the main character as well as the forward motion that is living and going after adventure for a life time and not just as a season in ones life. I love Italy and enjoyed the descriptives of the Italian way of life and culture. The story keeps you engaged, even when you have to put it down to complete a task you keep waiting for the moment you can pick it back up and continue the adventure..." - J. Edgar

Thirty-five Years : A Retrospective

Thirty-five Years A Retrospective

My Photography

In 1980 I started using a 35mm single reflex Pentax. In 1981, I received my first recognition with a first place award in a small photo contest.

In 1983 I submitted my work to the Friends of Photography and I was accepted into Ansel Adams workshop. The week I spent with Ansel Adams, Ruth Bernard, Lucien Clergue, Jay Dusard and others changed not only my view of my photography, but my view of life and my place in it.

I thought it would be interesting to compare my new photos; with photos taken and printed thirty-five years ago, and see how much my vision of the world has changed. All art is a form of communication, and I have used imagery to represent the feelings, ideas inspiration, and spiritual bond to communicate what I was feeling when at the moment I had taken the photographs.